Final Draft Essay 1

Ty Berg                                                                                                                         2/27/17

Final Draft                                                                                                                  ELA 122

Success can be measured in many different ways, but the most common is from a socioeconomic standpoint or the idea of gaining social goods. The social goods you gain from a Discourse may vary depending on where that discourse is placed in today’s social hierarchy.Some Discourses are more valued than others because you gain different social goods. I prefer the more generous approach where anyone who is literate in a Discourse is already successful regardless of the social goods they gain. Most people will view the success of a discourse based on the social goods gained from the discourse.

Gee would say “Dominant Discourses are secondary Discourses the mastery of which, at a particular place and time. Brings with it the (potential) acquisition of social “goods” (money, prestige, status, etc.)” (8) , in other words he would agree with the idea that there is a social hierarchy within discourses. He would not agree with my approach that anyone who is literate in any sort of discourse is successful. He believes that the amount of success achieved from a discourse is based on the social goods you gain from it. Another idea from Gee is this idea that once you are literate in a discourse you are technically a master and therefore would no longer be an apprentice. In Brandt’s words, master would be Sponsors and apprentices would be the people that the sponsors promote. I think we need to forget about the idea of this social hierarchy and have a more open mindset on things. Success of a Discourse should be based on what that Discourse is and how well the person knows it.

“As the twentieth century turned the abilities to read and write into widely exploitable resources, commercial sponsorship abounded”  says Brandt (557). In other words being literate contributed to more success so more people or Sponsors decided to enlighten themselves. She is basically stating the fact that in our present time period the acquisition of literacy helps lead people to be more successful. A conflicting statement from Gee says, “Social groups will not, Usually give their social goods…to those who are not “native” or “fluent users” (10). So even though becoming literate is on the rise the access in which is given depends on who is giving it. Most people who have mastered a Discourse or have become a Sponsor are the ones who determine who they want to teach what they know because what would be the point in teaching someone a Discourse that you took the time to know without getting anything from it.

Brant would say that if you become a sponsor then you have achieved literacy success. “Sponsors, as we ordinarily think of them, are powerful figure who bankroll events or smooth the way for initiates” (557). Sponsors are people who gain the social goods that were explained by Gee. Sponsors help by sponsoring other people which helps advertise their success and make them even more successful. At the same time making others successful by sponsoring them but they only would choose people who would help them gain social goods. So both Gee and Brant support the side that follows the idea of this social hierarchy. Brandt’s idea is similar to Gee’s because she believes that once you have gained the title of being a sponsor (master) then you have the opportunity to take on apprentices. I think Brant would support both ideas; the idea of a social hierarchy and a more laid back point of view were it depends on who the sponsor is and how well they know their Discourse that determines their success. A sponsor could be a teacher to student relationship where the teacher is teaching the student what they know and then the student can then apply what they learned. There is no guarantee that the Sponsor (teacher) will gain anything from teaching the student but they do it anyways.

“How Dance Changed My Life” by Taylor Brouillette, is her story how dancing helped to shape the person she is today and make it to college. She has been dancing ever since the age of two and has always loved it. Gee would say that she would be literate in the discourse of dancing and he would say that she is successful in that discourse. She is successful in Gees eyes because in her dancing career she has gained social goods such as money and status from competing in dance competitions. On top of her success in the past she can further her success after being accepted on her college dance team. Even though dancing would not be defined as a dominant secondary discourse but because of the work she put in over time it meets the requirements and then some. Meaning she gained more than just social goods but it also shaped who she is today so Gee would define that as part of her Primary Discourse as well as a Dominant secondary discourse. Brant would now see her as a Sponsor who then has the opportunity to sponsor others but the argument there would but what would she gain from that.

“How I graduated study skills” by Aidan Shaw-Pigeon and  “SAT’s Take Two” by Quentin Duperry are two different Narratives with very similar experiences. Both students explain about a time in their life when they had some sort of struggle in school and then overcame their struggles. Aidan explains his transition into high school and how the tests and work became harder for him. In 8th grade he joined a studying skills development class with a teacher named Ms. Halnon. She helped him develop his studying skills which in turn helped him get better grades; helping him get into college. Quentin’s story is very similar because of the fact that he also developed studying skills which helped him get a better grade on the SAT’s, which helped him get into college. These examples fit more with what I believe rather than what Gee and Brant are saying. What they gained from their experiences wouldn’t be considered social goods but from their point of view they gained a lot from the Discourse they learned.

Work Cited

Brouillette, Taylor. “How Dance Changed My Life.” Rising Cairn. University of New England.

December 1, 2016. Medium. March 6, 2017

Duperry, Quentin. “SAT’s Take Two.” Rising Cairn. University of New England. December 5,

  1. Medium. March 6, 2017.

Shaw-Pigeon, Aidan. “How I graduated study skills.” Rising Cairn. University of New England.

December 5, 2016. Medium. March 6, 2017.

Gee, Paul. “Literacy, Discourse, and Linguistics: Introduction.” Department of Linguistics,

University of Southern California. Volume 171 #1, 1989. March 6, 2017.

Brandt, Deborah. “Sponsors of Literacy.”

Essay 2 notes/outline

Ty Berg

Notes/Outline

 Claim

Being a part of Higher Education is huge opportunity in a person’s life, it can open up many pathways toward a successful future.

Questions

  1. What characterizes a person as being educated?
    • I think that a person can be defined as educated when they are capable of maintaining their life financially and have a balance of book smarts and  “common sense”. For instance a person who is financially stable, who has graduated high school and knows how to handle themselves in the real world would be defined as educated in my eyes.
  2. How does the CAS core curriculum and Unger ideas ideas compare?
  3. Is Higher Education required in order to be successful in life?
    • Higher Education is not required to be successful in life but it does open up what will be available to you. Someone who has a college degree is way more likely to get a higher paying job than someone who just has a high school diploma.
  4. What is or should be the purpose of college?
    • I think the there are many reasons to go to college, one of them being that it helps transition from adolescence to adulthood. It is the first step to really getting your life started. It teaches young adult responsibility and helps them learn how to be more independent. A lot of the time new college students have no idea what they want to do with there life. By going to college you can experiment and look into a wide variety of things to learn. Once you figure that out then you basically give your life some direction.
  5. Is core curriculum relevant and why?
    • Whether or not core curriculum is important has been a highly debated topic. I think it is important to teach core classes in highschool where you establish a baseline of general knowledge. Then once you move on to college it should be more focused on the specific major you’re taking rather than core classes that don’t apply to your major.
  6. Why should we learn core curriculum on top of a specific major?
    • Core curriculum sets up a base of knowledge that helps you to better understand the more complex learnings. I do think core curriculum should be cut back a little once you move on to higher education. We should be more focused on our specific major and cut back on core curriculum a little bit. For instance why should an english major ever have to learn per-calc or trig, it is essentially pointless to learn.
  7. What type of Discourses would you fall under depending on your major?
    • Gee defines anything that bring you social goods as a Dominant secondary discourse. So any major that will bring any sort of wealth, and social status.
  8. What do most people think about when they think about college?
    • From a student’s point of view we think about how it is going to be living without your parents with other roommates. The thought that you choose what to do with your time and have all the freedom in the world. I thought college would be kind of a breeze but that’s coming from someone who went to a very small school and didn’t have to do homework and still passed.
  9. How do these preconceptions or assumptions compare to your actual experience?
    • My leniency in high school caused me to struggle during my first semester of college. I was not used to it being work to actually figure out what you had for homework or most of my assignments being online. You really got to stay up to date in your classes and make sure you try to spread out your time evenly throughout the days. College is rough because there are three things you need but only two you can choose, which is good grade, sleep, and a social life.
  10. What should the “college experience” entail?
  1. What should be the goals of a college education?
  2. Where are these defined in your UNE curriculum?
  3. Is or should college be for everyone?
  4. How is a 4-year undergraduate degree different from other types of education?
  5. What do or should students learn in college?
  6. What does it mean for an institution to have values and attempt to instill them in the students who attend?
  7. What connections do you see between the courses you take and the values statements described in the curriculum (general education and major)?

Key Ideas

Unger- Supports the liberal arts but feels as though there should be changes

Neusner- He feels we should focus more on the major rather than core curriculum

Gee- Core curriculum=Primary Discourses, Major=Dominant Secondary Discourses.

 CAS core curriculum

The CAS breaks up the core curriculum into 4 different parts: Environmental Awareness, Social and Global Awareness, Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges, and Citizenship. The CAS core prepares students for life after college and teaches them to think and care for themselves. The first part teaches us about today environmental issues and also critical thinking skills. Social and Global Awareness (SGA) and Human Traditions (HT) are the two types of courses that are taken in the second year. The SGA courses teach students about human experiences in cultural, societal, national, and global contexts. The Human Traditions courses examines the philosophical, religious, and economic ideas that shaped ancient cultures and the modern world. The Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges part helps both students and faculty face the challenges that present themselves in their individual majors. The citizenship theme includes a seminar that challenges students to understand the balance between making a living and making a life, which also includes community service and civic activity.

 Essay Format

Introduction:

  • Claim
  • Bring in Gee, Unger, and the CAS Core curriculum
  • State your own thoughts, ideas and opinion
  • Make a clear claim as to what you’re writing about

Body

  1. Gees point of view and what he things about higher education, then state what I think about what he thinks.
  2. State ungers 7 misperceptions and how they relate, then do you agree or disagree with him and why
  3. The CAS formate and what it actually is, then again what you think about it and why.
  4. Compare Ungers ideas to the CAS format, Does unger support the core curriculum?
  5. Compare Gee too both Ungers ideas and the CAS core curriculum, How does Gees ideas about discourses relate.
  6. Could compare Gee and Unge. How could you relate discourses to Unger, How would unger compare his ideas to discourses.

Conclusion:

  • Recap the intro
  • Recap the body
  • State your claim again
  • And give your overview on what you think of it all
  • State whether your claim was supported or not by Unger, Gee and the CAS

Two Revised Paragraphs

  1. Introduction: Needs to more organized and  clear as to what the claim is and needs to include my own ideas and bring in who I will be incorporating from outside sources into my essay.
  2. Comparing Unger and the CAS Formate: Go through and connect which stages Ungers misperceptions would match up with the CAS outline.

                                                       

Higher Discourse Framing Statement

Higher Discourse Framing statements

  • Writing as a Recursive process: This time around I think I improve. As you can see in my Essay notes and rough draft of my essay.
  • Integrate Ideas with Those of Others: I took into account the ideas that my peers presented to me in the peer review portion of the essay. Also I integrated the ideas of outside sources into my essay.
  • Active Reading, Critical Reading, and Informal Reading Response: I lacked on this the second half of the semester. In the first half I had printed packets of all the work and had been highlighting and making notes in them. But this half I just pulled the up on my laptop and read them from there.
  • Critique Own and Other’s’ Work: I have been and keep making solid informative comments on peers papers. And have had my paper looked and commented on my 4 people. I have then been making side note in my journal.
  • Document Work Using Appropriate Conventions (MLA): When needed the citing is easily accessible in the database library.
  • Control Individualized Error Patterns: The second semester I was much better at organizing my work. I wrote an outline for my essay in the notes portion of it. I limited grammatical errors by having an english teacher in sassy look over some of it.
  • Engagement: I’m always willing to engage and start a conversation in class. Times when we group up in class i’m usually the one leading the discussion. Although I engage well in class my attendance could have been better.

Final Draft Essay 2

Ty Berg

Final Draft Essay 2

One goal of Higher Education is to create opportunities to acquire social goods, so therefor it would be defined as a Dominant Secondary Discourse. Gee defines a Discourse as “saying (writing)-doing-being-valuing -believing combinations” (6). Gee then breaks down Discourses into Primary and Secondary discourses, and even further in Dominant and Non-Dominant Discourses which can applies to Secondary Discourses only. Dominant Secondary Discourses fit best with higher education because Gee defines Secondary Discourses as something that brings social goods and social status. “Dominant Discourses are secondary Discourses the mastery of which, at a particular place and time. Brings with it the (potential) acquisition of social “goods” (money, prestige, status, etc.)” (8). This is Gee’s definition of what social goods are and how they are acquired. Those who acquire  Higher Education have a better chance of success than those who don’t. The comparison of the CAS core curriculum and Ungers ideas provide a lot of feedback on how Higher Education is doing. I want to compare the basic core curriculum lay out to Unger’s ideas of how the core curriculum should be today.

The CAS breaks up the core curriculum into 4 different parts: Environmental Awareness, Social and Global Awareness, Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges, and Citizenship. The CAS core prepares students for life after college and teaches them to think and care for themselves. The first part teaches us about today environmental issues and also critical thinking skills. Social and Global Awareness (SGA) and Human Traditions (HT) are the two types of courses that are taken in the second year. The SGA courses teach students about human experiences in cultural, societal, national, and global contexts. The Human Traditions courses examines the philosophical, religious, and economic ideas that shaped ancient cultures and the modern world. The Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges part helps both students and faculty face the challenges that present themselves in their individual majors. The citizenship theme includes a seminar that challenges students to understand the balance between making a living and making a life, which also includes community service and civic activity. I think the CAS core curriculum focuses on teaching about real world event and topics. It is designed to keep us up to date on what is going on in the world. I like that they focus on teaching us how to think critically and basically take care of ourselves. I just think they need to reevaluate a new system of assigning core classes based on your specific major.

Ungers ideas are defined as the 7 Misperceptions or in Graff and Birkenstein words “common assumptions”. He knew many people were opposed to his ideas to change the core curriculum but I think in more people would support his changes than not, unless they were in a position to benefit from the core curriculum. Unger specifically brings up the costs of Higher education and advantages that the rich have over the pore. He has this idea that those with money think those without money don’t value knowledge like they do. Those who have money wouldn’t want those without money to gain enough knowledge to threaten them. Although that seems very extreme it is true that those who are rich would not want to lose their fortune. I would have to agree with Unger’s Misperceptions because they mostly benefit to the middle or lower class. His ideas talk about how difficult it is for people without money to get into college.

Unger said that “It may be that studying the liberal arts is actually the best form of career education.” The CAS curriculum supports Ungers misperception number 4. In this misperception Unger believes that students should study both the arts and sciences. The CAS core curriculum incorporates both courses from the arts and sciences. Unger thinks that liberal education and politics should not affiliate with each other. Students should rely on multiple forms of ideology. Not all perspectives have answers. “Only a true liberal education can turn this country around.” I don’t know if I fully agree with the fact that we should learn both the arts and sciences of liberal arts. I never like feeling that some of the classes that i’m being thought are completely pointless and I can never see myself using them in the future. But I can see the upside to having a basic set of knowledge about all areas of education. I just think the extent of core curriculum should be taught in high school. Whereas in Higher Education should focus more on the Major portion of things but both the core curriculum and Major are important to higher education.

Gee would relate Core curriculum to Primary Discourses, and Majors to Dominant Secondary Discourses. Gee Defines Primary Discourse as your base personality such as your morals, religion, your immediate family. Whereas core curriculum is the base material that Higher education requires you to learn. Dominant Secondary Discourse are already defined as something that brings you social goods, such as wealth or social status. A Major is a specific job or field that you ‘Master’, that also brings social goods. From Gee’s point of view anything that doesn’t bring social goods is not a successful discourse but almost all majors leads to social goods. I think Gee thinks both core curriculum and Majors are important together and that both would be required to get a true Higher Education or as Gee would say, to truly master a discourse. Being a student of higher education I feel as though a lot of the core curriculum classes are at this moment irrelevant for an Animal Behavior major.

I think attending college and getting a college degree is the definition of Higher Education. Higher Education is the advancement in a specific line of work that is going to produce social goods and hopefully a sustainable future. The main reason people attend college is to get a degree to obtain a job that you will enjoy not suffer through. I came to UNE do get a degree as an Animal Behavior Major. I also came here because the school is in a beautiful location and also had the specific major that I wanted.

Rough Draft Essay 2

Ty Berg                                                                                                                                 4/10/17

Essay 2 Rough Draft                                                                                                            Eng-123

One goal of Higher Education is to create opportunitys to acquire social goods, so therefor it would be defined as a Dominant Secondary Discourse. Gee defines a Discourse as “saying (writing)-doing-being-valuing -believing combinations” (6). Gee then breaks down Discourses into Primary and Secondary discourses, and even further in Dominant and Non-Dominant Discourses which can applies to Secondary Discourses only. Dominant Secondary Discourses fit best with higher education because Gee defines Secondary Discourses as something that brings social goods and social status. Those who acquire  Higher Education have a better chance of success than those who don’t. The comparison of the CAS core curriculum and Ungers ideas provide a lot of feedback on how Higher Education is doing.

The CAS breaks up the core curriculum into 4 different parts: Environmental Awareness, Social and Global Awareness, Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges, and Citizenship. The CAS core prepares students for life after college and teaches them to think and care for themselves. The first part teaches us about today environmental issues and also critical thinking skills. Social and Global Awareness (SGA) and Human Traditions (HT) are the two types of courses that are taken in the second year. The SGA courses teach students about human experiences in cultural, societal, national, and global contexts. The Human Traditions courses examines the philosophical, religious, and economic ideas that shaped ancient cultures and the modern world. The Critical Thinking: Human Responses to Problems and Challenges part helps both students and faculty face the challenges that present themselves in their individual majors. The citizenship theme includes a seminar that challenges students to understand the balance between making a living and making a life, which also includes community service and civic activity.

Ungers ideas are defined as the 7 Misperceptions or in his words “common assumptions”. He assumes that almost everyone has thought of or agrees with his ideas because they contribute to making the Higher Education system better.

Unger said that “It may be that studying the liberal arts is actually the best form of career education.” The CAS curriculum supports Ungers misperception number 4. In this misperception Unger believes that students should study both the arts and sciences. The CAS core curriculum incorporates both courses from the arts and sciences. Unger thinks that liberal education and politics should not affiliate with each other. Students should rely on multiple forms of ideology. Not all perspectives have answers. “Only a true liberal education can turn this country around.”

Final Writing Assignment

Ty Berg                                                                                                Final Writing Assignment

Nancy Sommers understands that there is a gap between student writers and experienced adult writers. She said when students approach writing as a recursive process they are unable to see the revision process as something more than rewording. Experienced adult writers have already figured out how to see that ‘something more’ within the text. They have discovered that the more you keep revising your work the more in depth ideas you will see and develop. Revision is a difficult task because you are looking over your own ideas and my be blind sided by you own writing. Even though revision is a difficult process it is necessary to produce a well written piece of work.

Revision is an important part of any writing process and is done by every reknown writer known to man. I think the revision part of the writing process is the longest part but it is how you produce excellent writing pieces. Nancy Sommers thinks most students can’t see the ‘something larger’ while revising. In other word they can’t see past the actual wording of the writing too get to the more in depth revision. As for experienced adult writers, she thinks they are able to go in more depth in the essay than students are. “Two elements of the experienced writers’ theory of the revision process are the adoption of a holistic perspective and the perception that revision is a recursive process.” Essentially those who have multiple stages of a recursive process tend to produce literature far beyond those who don’t.

I would have to agree with Nancy because I myself have scratched the surface and seen these more in depth ideas but it’s being able to formulate these ideas on paper which is difficult. I can also relate to her idea that as you revise ideas are constantly changing and it becomes difficult to pinpoint a focus. My revision process consists of getting as much information about my topic written down. My next step was to formulate a rough draft, then using that rough draft I made a final draft outline. The final draft outline organized my final draft and help pinpoint points of focus. After all the essays I’ve written throughout the year whether it was for English or a different class, I have come to the conclusion that revision is the most important thing. But you also need other parts to even revise in the first place. In highschool I was taught how to write a basic 5 paragraph essay but once I got to college writing became a little more difficult.  As I reread past things I wrote, I constantly find errors or things that I would change but the first time I wrote it it sounded great. Teachers now emphasize more than ever about getting your work looked at by other people. This helps with the problem of not being able to see past your own ideas in your writing. There are always changes that can be made.

I really started to get a sense of Nancy’s ideas of a ‘deeper meaning’ within the writing when I was writing my final draft for my essay. I had found myself constantly looking over my work trying to come up with what to write. As I kept reading I started seeing the ‘deeper meaning’ behind the words but struggled to get them on the page. Nancy states that “This sense, however, is constantly in flux as ideas are developed and modified.” Although revision is a long and tedious process it is essential to writing and should be expressed more in the lower levels of education.

10 Literacy Narritives Thoughts

I feel as though there is a wide verity of good and bad experiences that were written. But each one Literacy Narrative explains how each individual was impacted by Literacy. Everyone’s writing style is similar because its all from the point of view from the writer and they are personal and impactful memories. Some people believe reading and writing is an outlet or a big part of their life. While others feel that it is a waste of time and even hate it. But for each person has some point or event in their life were they began to ether love reading and hate reading.

Alexander writing quetions 1-4

          

Questions for Reading Alexander (608-14)

  1. Alexander refers to the “literacy success story” as a cultural narrative that many student writers borrow from in their own literacy narratives. How does Alexander explain the appeal of this particular narrative? Do the Rising Cairn narratives you’ve sampled conform to this narrative? Answer: It is a very common literacy narrative about how literacy leads to some sort of success. She said that 1/3 of all the narrative were some form of a literacy success story. There is only so many literacy experiences we have gone through in our lives, and with similar schooling all over, there is a limit to what could be written about. After reading the Literacy Narratives I believe Alexander is correct.
  2. The “literacy success story” is an example of what Alexander and others calls  a “master narrative.” Use direct quotation to define this term, then paraphrase Alexander’s explanation of why the literacy success story is problematic. Answer: “Also known as gran or metanarratives, master narrative both have the unfortunate result of gross overgeneralization and act invisibly to structure and define out lives.”  A mastery Narrative is a story with a very general idea that the author wanted to get across. It mainly is by those with power that want people to feel or think a way that they want you too. The problem with that is that it could be leaving out key details that could impact the main idea greatly.  Without the details people are really unable to think about the main idea a different way.
  3. Alexander suggests that “little narratives” offer alternatives for representing one’s literacy experiences. What does she say characterizes “little narratives”? Find at least two examples and summarize them here. Answer: ” little narratives are unsanctioned, artistic, and imaginative; they are less generalized and more individualized and situated.” They provide alternatives to the master narratives ideas. When the little narratives start to pick up momentum the master narratives lose momentum.
  4. Look at the questions Alexander poses and compare them to our emerging list of global and local questions. Take note of which questions help us to locate master narratives and which might guide us towards little narratives. Answer:

What Can I Learn From A Literacy Narrative?

For one, I can learn what the Narrative is about and what meaning it has to the author. But if I’ve learned anything, it is to pay attention to how the author writes. There could always be some new way or idea about writing that you could incorporate in your own writing. It all depends on what your purpose of reading the Narrative is. For example you could read a Narrative to learn more about someone’s background or learn more about a specific topic of reading and writing. There can be opportunities to grow as an individual and help learn something about ourselves while reading Literacy Narratives.